Energy labels

Energy labels must be provided for any washing machine or dishwasher and these have just been revised to new EU standards. AMDEA has published a handy guide to the new labels. Click here to download EU Energy Label Guide March 2012. The labels illustrated here are the new versions being introduced in 2011. These show how much energy the appliances use overall, in standard tests. For washing machines these tests are carried out on a 60°C cotton wash at full and partial load and a 40°C cotton programme at partial load. To get an idea of how much you could save by replacing your old washing machine or dishwasher use our online calculator.

All washing machines and dishwasher energy labels have arrows showing which category they fit into, from green (energy efficient) to red (inefficient), and a number of kWh (electrical ‘units’) per annum. They also offer performance details on a range of other relevant features, represented by appropriate symbols. Hover over the symbols in the label illustrations for further information.

Washing machine label

Hover over the symbols for details

Dishwasher label

Hover over the symbols for details

Annual energy consumption in kWh Noise emissions in decibels during the washing phase – based on standard 60° cotton programme with full load Noise emissions in decibels during the spinning phase – based on standard 60° cotton programme with full load Spin drying efficiency class Capacity in kilograms Annual water consumption in litres Annual energy consumption in kWh – based on 280 standard cleaning cycles Noise emissions in decibels Capacity in standard place settings Drying efficiency class Annual water consumption in litres – based on 280 standard cleaning cycles

The kWh/annum gives you an idea of how much you can expect to pay to run the appliance in a year. To do this, just multiply the number of kWh/annum by the price of electricity (about 14.35p/unit in 2011). So the washing machine show is predicted to cost around £25 a year, in electricity charges. The spin rating is important as the dryer that washing is spun the less drying is needed — giving a saving in time and electricity cost. Spinning faster is a much cheaper way of drying the washing than leaving them for longer in the tumble dryer. This is just one of our energy saving tips, and of course depends on the recommendation on the clothing label.

The dishwasher shown is estimated to cost around £36 a year to run at current electricity prices — although these are likely to rise and so the actual electricity cost (and savings from moving to a more efficient appliance) may be substantially more. This annual cost is also only indicative, based on using 280 standard cleaning cycles.

The label also carries the washing capacity of the washing machine in kilos of dry cotton clothes or the number of place settings for dishwashers.

The sound pressure or ‘noise’ in decibels is also highlighted. The higher the value the greater the ‘noise’. 40dBA is the level at which it may cause distraction in an otherwise quiet room1 — but decibels are calculated on a ‘log’ scale — so each increase of 3dB is actually a doubling of the noise output.